The Wokingham Paper

Predict the rain, you could win the game

Rainbow
One thing that’s hard to predict is when you’ll see a ranbow. But Sunday night’s sudden heavy shower meant that borough residents were treated to a double rainbow. Reader Ian Hydon caught the moment on camera, at about 8.40pm. He said: “The setting sun was in the perfect angle and the intensity of the rain as well for the double rainbow to shine brightly.” Thanks for sharing Ian – we wonder how you’ll get on with the University of Reading’s prediction game?

Guessing the sun is all part of the fun in a new game launched for wannabe weather forecasters.

The Weather Game run by the University of Reading offers aspiring weather experts the chance to practise their skills in exchange for prizes.

The competition invites participants of all ages to submit their predictions for global locations using data from world-leading organisations.

Head of the Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading, where TV forecasters Laura Tobin and Tomasz Schafernaker studied, Professor Andrew Charlton-Perez says: “Many people will be playing football fantasy league again now matches are back on our screens, but this is a chance to show that you know a thing or two about science as well as sport.”

The game launched on Friday, July 3 and will run for six weeks.

It aims to give school pupils a taste of the science used on both television forecasts and to monitor the impacts of climate change.

Points are awarded to participants who make correct forecasts, and contestants can compare their progress with friends and experts in the field.

Professor Charlton-Perez adds: “We all notice when weather forecasters get it wrong, so why not try and beat them at their own game?

“We want players to think about why some forecasts are different to others, and to learn from both good and bad forecasts, just as we scientists do.

“The game provides a glimpse into meteorology teaching and research carried out at the University of Reading, where the next generation of weather and climate scientists are created.”

Players of the Weather Game are tasked with predicting how much rain, wind and sunshine there will be at certain times in four different locations around the world including Oklahoma and China.

Forecasts from leading sources like the Met Office and BBC Weather can be used as a basis for predictions, but players are encouraged to follow their own intuition on where weather might differ from what is expected.

To register for the Weather Game, visit rdg.ac/weathergame

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